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Bike To Work Flyer 2015 Final.pptx
Silver Celebration Flyer Final.pptx
May 2015 Bike Month Calendar Final.pdf

A paceline is a pact.  When you form up into a paceline, you’ve made an implicit agreement and a promise to everyone else in the group. The agreement: You’ll work together, safely and steadily, to further the group’s goals. The promise: That you know the basic rules of paceline riding and that you’re alert and ready to ride together.
No false moves.  The essence of paceline riding is predictability. Any abrupt moves or unexpected actions dangerously disrupt the paceline. If a rider near the front gets squirrely, the reactions can radiate through the paceline like a sports crowd doing the wave.
Don’t get grabby on the brakes.If you’re getting too close to the wheel in front of you, soft pedal to let your bike slow slightly, then smoothly resume applying power. If that's not enough, feather the brakes lightly. Never grab them. Or move over gradually till you're slightly out of the draft, and sit up slightly so your chest catches more air. You'll slow gently and regain the correct spacing to the next wheel.
Follow the leader(s).  The leaders or riders in front determine which way to rotate depending on the wind and traffic, usually. If the wind is from the side, you would want to rotate into it – if traffic allows. If the side wind is strong, riders may overlap wheels in the formation known as an echelon (assuming there’s enough space on the road, and traffic allows for it). If the wind is straight on, you rotate on whichever side is safest, based on traffic. In many cases, traffic alone will dictate the rotation side – regardless of wind direction. It should be easy to just follow what the leaders set as the "rules." And, if they know what they're doing, it'll be the most efficient way to ride down the road, and the fastest, too.
Keep some safety space.  Unless you’re riding with cyclists you know and trust, there’s no need to ride just inches from the wheel you're following. Allowing a gap of 2 feet or so gives you room to maneuver in case of mishaps or obstacles in the road. This is especially important on organized and other rides where you’re likely to form up with riders you don’t know, and can’t necessarily trust like you can your buddies.
Look up the road.  Don’t fixate on the rear wheel just ahead. Look around that rider and up the road so you can anticipate things (turns, potholes, traffic) that may cause a reaction by those ahead of you. Let the lower edge of your peripheral vision monitor the gap in front of your wheel.
Protect Your Wheel.  Touching wheels with the bike in front of you is one of the leading causes of crashes in a paceline. And you will crash, not the rider in front of you! Protect your wheel. But if you do happen to touch wheels, don’t panic. Remember to turn into – not away from – the wheel you’re rubbing, as you ease off the pedal pressure to fall back just enough to get clear of the wheel you’re following. Then smoothly apply power to get back to your proper position. If you do this right, the rider in front of you might not even realize you’ve touched.
Don’t Get Distracted.  Most crashes in pacelines are caused by distractions outside the paceline. For example, a dog running from a yard toward the line, which causes riders to lose focus. The key thing is to always remember that the biggest hazard is that rider in front of you, not anything on the side of the road or up the road or behind you. Your job is to pay attention to that rider directly in front of you.
Ride in the drops.  Doing so keeps you in the most aero position, which helps with the overall energy savings you’ll reap, and the overall efficiency of the paceline – the reasons you ride in a paceline. But riding in the drops has the added benefit of protecting you from being “hooked” by another rider’s bar. As riders are moving back down the line, or sometimes in a double paceline, there’s the chance of being hit from the side and getting your bar hooked by someone else’s bar – which can take you down in an instant. In effect, riding in the drops, you “seal off” the bar ends with your arms, making hooking impossible.
Communicate!  Pacelines are often quiet, except for double pacelines rolling at a conversational pace. When groups are going faster—and the danger is greater—let your fellow riders know what’s going on. There’s no need to shout out obstacles. Merely pointing at them is sufficient. But if there’s a question about the next intersection, or a turn, it’s far better to tell, or ask, than to guess.
Don’t increase the pace on your pull.  The biggest mistake novice riders make is getting all psyched up when they hit the front and increasing the speed several miles per hour. This opens gaps between riders and could blow some of them off the back. It makes the paceline ragged and wastes energy as riders have to surge to close gaps. Granted, it can be tough to know how hard to pedal when you're suddenly feeling the wind. But the solution is easy: Take a quick glance at your computer when you’re the second rider in line. When the leader pulls off, simply maintain that speed (assuming there's no wind or terrain change).
Don’t take monster pulls.  There’s no reason to sit on the front for 10 minutes, trying to impress everyone but exhausting yourself. Generally, give up the lead after 1-3 minutes and let other riders have some fun. Sometimes, though, a couple of riders may be much stronger than the others. Then it might be appropriate for them to pull for 5-8 minutes while the rest take short pulls or none at all. Discuss this so everyone knows what’s going on.
You’re the eyes and ears at the front.  As the lead rider, you’re the eyes and ears of the group. You are responsible for the whole group’s safety. You must point out road obstacles and watch for traffic at crossroads, shouting a warning if necessary. Try to be an “early warning system,” keeping in mind that a shout may take several seconds to trickle down the line, and may be “lost in translation” along the way.
Responsibility at the back, too.  When you rotate to the back of the paceline, you still have a special responsibility. It’s your job to check behind periodically for approaching traffic and calling out “Car back!” when a motorist is approaching. If the group is in a double paceline on a narrow road, someone will yell “Single out” or “Single up,” and the double paceline will form into a single line so the motorist can pass safely.
But when there are no traffic concerns, being last in line is a privileged position. Because no one is behind you to be disrupted by your actions, now’s the time to take a drink or sit up and grab a snack from your jersey pocket. Need to remove a vest or peel your arm warmers? Do it while at the back.
No aero bars!  Aero bars are fine for time trialing or long solo rides where they help you cut through the wind and take pressure off your hands. But aero bars are unwelcome in pacelines. A cyclist using aero bars in the paceline is less steady, and hands are far from the brake levers. They present particular dangers, both to themselves and to the other riders – and they should self-select out of pacelines.



Eye on the Road

9/7/2014

FVTC Letterhead

 

 


 

 

 

Dear Paul,

 

On September 7, 2014, join the Farmington Valley Trails Council for its inaugural Farm-to-Farm-to-Farm Ride. 

 

The ride starts at Iron Horse Boulevard at Jim Gallagher Way (formerly Mall Way) in Simsbury. Registration begins promptly at9 AM, with the ride commencing at 9:30 AM. 

 

The tour includes a number of Simsbury farms. Our first stop will be Pharos farm, Terry's Plain Road, then we continue on to Simsbury Town Farm, Wolcott Rd.  We will then move on to visit George Hall's Farm, Old Farms Road, Flamig Farm on West Mountain Road and Tulmeadow Farm on Farms Village Road. At our final stop, Rosedale Farm on East Weatogue Street, we will taste wine made from grapes from their vineyard.

 

At each farm a spokesperson will give a brief history of their farm.  Participants will have the opportunity to purchase locally grown vegetables, flowers and various food items. Purchases will be labeled with the purchaser's name and transported by van back to Iron Horse Boulevard.

 

We will be covering approximately 22 miles in all, most of which is on flat country roads.

 

A $20 donation is suggested for this ride. Cue sheets and information on each farm will be provided at registration.

 

The ride proceeds in light rain - heavy rain cancels.

  








Simsbury Parks and Rec. has openings in 2 cycling classes in Sept.  Please spread the word and sign up soon!

 

Biking -Traffic Skills 101

Sunday, Sept. 14, 8:30 am – 5 pm

For the skills, knowledge and confidence  to ride safely and legally on roads and multi-use trails. 

Through classroom instruction, on-bike drills, and a group ride, this class will cover

the bicycle safety check, starting, stopping, shifting, scanning, proper lane/intersection positioning, crash avoidance techniques, and fixing a flat.  Completion of Traffic Skills 101 is a prerequisite for other cycling courses including the certification course for League Cycling Instructors.

Ages 15 and up.  

League Certified Instructors (LCI’s):   Jim Arnold & Steve Mitchell

This class is being sponsored by Mitchell Auto Group.

http://www.simsburyrec.com/info/activities/program_details.aspx?ProgramID=28708

 

 

Mountain Biking 101 Clinic for Teens

Sat. Sept. 6 & Sunday Sept 7, 9:00-noon

Learn fundamentals.  Advance your skills.  Gain confidence on the trail.

If you're a teen who is proficient at riding a bike, you have a decent level of fitness, and you want to learn how to mountain bike on technical trails through the woods, this clinic is for you.   You'll learn:  proper body positioning,  climbing and descending techniques, braking quickly without skidding or going over the bars (a.k.a. an "endo"), the best lines in technical terrain, how to maneuver around and over things like roots, rocks and logs.

Ages 12-17.  Girls encouraged to attend.

Certified Mountain Bike Instructor:   Margie Bowen

http://www.simsburyrec.com/info/activities/program_details.aspx?ProgramID=28734





Ride of Silence - Unfortunately, another reason to organize a Ride of Silence in your town.  While everyone of our towns should organize this event, Bloomfield should be high on the local riders list.  Designed to honor those killed/injured while biking, it serves as a great reminder/teaching moment for good habits when sharing the road.   Here is the link to this global event that needs more emphasis in CT  http://www.rideofsilence.org/main.php 

 

Feel free to email with questions.  Here is link to our ride in Danbury http://www.newstimes.com/local/article/Riding-and-remembering-5496747.php

 

Sometimes these tragedies encourage people to become bicycling advocates.  Hat City Cyclists has developed an Advocacy page on their website.  If after looking it over, you are motivated to advocate for bicycling and have questions or just want to discuss ideas, feel free to email.  http://www.hatcitycyclists.org/content.aspx?page_id=22&club_id=164562&module_id=148767 

 



Paul Hughes – killed while riding

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/hartfordcourant/obituary.aspx?n=paul-m-hughes&pid=171824874&fhid=4097

 

http://beatbikeblog.blogspot.com/2014/07/a-ghost-bike-in-bloomfield.html

 

http://articles.courant.com/2014-07-18/community/hc-bloomfield-fatal-bike-0719-20140718_1_pick-up-truck-bicyclist-hit-and-killed-fox-ct-report

VALLEY CYCLING will ride from Granby Starbucks, at 10:15 am Friday, August 1, to the Church in Bloomfield – some may attend 11:00service, some will ride back – wear your yellow

Bitter battle between motorists and bikers

http://usat.ly/1mbgcpG

Make Way for the Collinsville Farmers Market!

 

Dear Area Cyclists:

 

Beginning Sunday June 8, the Collinsville Farmers Market will

be held in the Canton Town Hall parking lot every Sunday from

10 – 1, through October.

 

The Canton Police Department and Market organizers ask that you kindly help out the local farmers who participate in this market, by parking elsewhere in Collinsville before you begin a Sunday morning ride.

 

Your assistance will allow farmers to set up their tents on Sunday mornings.

 

Thanks for your help. If you have questions, call Collinsville Market Committee Chairman Tom Sevigny at 860-693-8344.

 

And join us every Sunday from 10-1 and enjoy the local harvest!

 

         For more info see www.collinsvillefarmersmarket.org

                        and see us on Facebook and on Twitter.

 




The Pan Mass Challenge Kids Ride is coming up on May 10 in Suffield, all information is below. 


 We hope to raise $20,000 for The Jimmy Fund, adding to the $27,000 raised the last two years. It is a great day to ride (age 3-16), volunteer or donate to/support a great cause. We have a great raffle and donations of items to that effort are appreciated as well.

 We will also have the 2004, 2007 & 2013 Red Sox World Series Trophies on site from 8 -10 AM that day, the ride starts shortly after that.

Info and registration is at this link: http://www.kids.pmc.org/suffield.aspx 

Anything your group can do to help spread the word is appreciated, by email, Facebook or otherwise. 

 Chris Nikolis

 








I’ve attached some info on the Bike A Thon ride I help out with every spring.  The flyer is attached and there is also a link to the registration. 


http://biact.homestead.com/


Save the Date! 

Saturday July 12, 2014

Is Fast Approaching!

                                            

As the ERRACE (Everyone Ride/Run Against Cancer Everyday) organizational team we are asking for your help in our fight against cancer.  Our goal is not only to raise funds to support cancer care and research, but also to inspire good health, fitness, self awareness and to challenge you to try something new.

 

Like last year, our one-day 2014 event will be held at the Helen and Harry Gray Cancer Center in Avon, CT and will include a supported 25, 50, or 100-mile road bike ride, a 20-mile technical mountain bike ride and a 5 km run/walk.  In addition, we plan to have a return of the exotic car corral/parade, wellness tent, raffle, giveaways, and fabulous food.

 

The rain last year didn't stop over 700 cyclists, runners and walkers from coming out and  raising over $135,000, thanks in part to our top fundraising team miles4mary and countless volunteers and our sponsors. Funds from ERRACE will continue to be split between the LIVESTRONG foundation and the Helen and Harry Gray Cancer Center.

 

To find out more please go to www.errace.org .  Please save the date and start training. We will inform you when registration is open.

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us. 

 

See you on July 12th!

Sincerely,

The ERRACE Organizational Team

 

ERRACE
PO Box 485
Portland, Connecticut 06480




May 2014 Simsbury Bike Calendar V7

From The New York Times:

Gadgets to Boost Bike Safety

An air-bag scarf that turns into a helmet on impact, a bike horn that mimics a car horn and other marvels of modern cycling.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/03/10/gadgets-to-boost-bike-safety/




A paceline is a pact.
  When you form up into a paceline, you’ve made an implicit agreement and a promise to everyone else in the group. The agreement: You’ll work together, safely and steadily, to further the group’s goals. The promise: That you know the basic rules of paceline riding and that you’re alert and ready to ride together.


No false moves.  The essence of paceline riding is predictability. Any abrupt moves or unexpected actions dangerously disrupt the paceline. If a rider near the front gets squirrely, the reactions can radiate through the paceline like a sports crowd doing the wave.

Don’t get grabby on the brakes.If you’re getting too close to the wheel in front of you, soft pedal to let your bike slow slightly, then smoothly resume applying power. If that's not enough, feather the brakes lightly. Never grab them. Or move over gradually till you're slightly out of the draft, and sit up slightly so your chest catches more air. You'll slow gently and regain the correct spacing to the next wheel.

Follow the leader(s).  The leaders or riders in front determine which way to rotate depending on the wind and traffic, usually. If the wind is from the side, you would want to rotate into it – if traffic allows. If the side wind is strong, riders may overlap wheels in the formation known as an echelon (assuming there’s enough space on the road, and traffic allows for it). If the wind is straight on, you rotate on whichever side is safest, based on traffic. In many cases, traffic alone will dictate the rotation side – regardless of wind direction. It should be easy to just follow what the leaders set as the "rules." And, if they know what they're doing, it'll be the most efficient way to ride down the road, and the fastest, too.

Keep some safety space.  Unless you’re riding with cyclists you know and trust, there’s no need to ride just inches from the wheel you're following. Allowing a gap of 2 feet or so gives you room to maneuver in case of mishaps or obstacles in the road. This is especially important on organized and other rides where you’re likely to form up with riders you don’t know, and can’t necessarily trust like you can your buddies.

Look up the road.  Don’t fixate on the rear wheel just ahead. Look around that rider and up the road so you can anticipate things (turns, potholes, traffic) that may cause a reaction by those ahead of you. Let the lower edge of your peripheral vision monitor the gap in front of your wheel.

Protect Your Wheel.  Touching wheels with the bike in front of you is one of the leading causes of crashes in a paceline. And you will crash, not the rider in front of you! Protect your wheel. But if you do happen to touch wheels, don’t panic. Remember to turn into – not away from – the wheel you’re rubbing, as you ease off the pedal pressure to fall back just enough to get clear of the wheel you’re following. Then smoothly apply power to get back to your proper position. If you do this right, the rider in front of you might not even realize you’ve touched.

Don’t Get Distracted.  Most crashes in pacelines are caused by distractions outside the paceline. For example, a dog running from a yard toward the line, which causes riders to lose focus. The key thing is to always remember that the biggest hazard is that rider in front of you, not anything on the side of the road or up the road or behind you. Your job is to pay attention to that rider directly in front of you.

Ride in the drops.  Doing so keeps you in the most aero position, which helps with the overall energy savings you’ll reap, and the overall efficiency of the paceline – the reasons you ride in a paceline. But riding in the drops has the added benefit of protecting you from being “hooked” by another rider’s bar. As riders are moving back down the line, or sometimes in a double paceline, there’s the chance of being hit from the side and getting your bar hooked by someone else’s bar – which can take you down in an instant. In effect, riding in the drops, you “seal off” the bar ends with your arms, making hooking impossible.

Communicate!  Pacelines are often quiet, except for double pacelines rolling at a conversational pace. When groups are going faster—and the danger is greater—let your fellow riders know what’s going on. There’s no need to shout out obstacles. Merely pointing at them is sufficient. But if there’s a question about the next intersection, or a turn, it’s far better to tell, or ask, than to guess.

Don’t increase the pace on your pull.  The biggest mistake novice riders make is getting all psyched up when they hit the front and increasing the speed several miles per hour. This opens gaps between riders and could blow some of them off the back. It makes the paceline ragged and wastes energy as riders have to surge to close gaps. Granted, it can be tough to know how hard to pedal when you're suddenly feeling the wind. But the solution is easy: Take a quick glance at your computer when you’re the second rider in line. When the leader pulls off, simply maintain that speed (assuming there's no wind or terrain change).

Don’t take monster pulls.  There’s no reason to sit on the front for 10 minutes, trying to impress everyone but exhausting yourself. Generally, give up the lead after 1-3 minutes and let other riders have some fun. Sometimes, though, a couple of riders may be much stronger than the others. Then it might be appropriate for them to pull for 5-8 minutes while the rest take short pulls or none at all. Discuss this so everyone knows what’s going on.

You’re the eyes and ears at the front.  As the lead rider, you’re the eyes and ears of the group. You are responsible for the whole group’s safety. You must point out road obstacles and watch for traffic at crossroads, shouting a warning if necessary. Try to be an “early warning system,” keeping in mind that a shout may take several seconds to trickle down the line, and may be “lost in translation” along the way.

Responsibility at the back, too.  When you rotate to the back of the paceline, you still have a special responsibility. It’s your job to check behind periodically for approaching traffic and calling out “Car back!” when a motorist is approaching. If the group is in a double paceline on a narrow road, someone will yell “Single out” or “Single up,” and the double paceline will form into a single line so the motorist can pass safely.

But when there are no traffic concerns, being last in line is a privileged position. Because no one is behind you to be disrupted by your actions, now’s the time to take a drink or sit up and grab a snack from your jersey pocket. Need to remove a vest or peel your arm warmers? Do it while at the back.

No aero bars!  Aero bars are fine for time trialing or long solo rides where they help you cut through the wind and take pressure off your hands. But aero bars are unwelcome in pacelines. A cyclist using aero bars in the paceline is less steady, and hands are far from the brake levers. They present particular dangers, both to themselves and to the other riders – and they should self-select out of pacelines.






http://www.robsonforensic.com/library/files/Articles/Bicycle-Brake-Expert.pdf?utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=11747039&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--SUr8yC2pKyWEoZqNif9MC-6KNgtaPPcIriVyYv6dkjudcUEUutDo9gaNE4r3EIHXM_FWYD42280CPSmbz291D7JqrAA&_hsmi=11747039

Dear Motorist 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Euu2QRIuEPk#t=271

4
When







Tuesday November 12, 2013 from 5:30 PM to 9:00 PM EST







Add to Calendar
 








Where
Central Connecticut State University







Student Center/Alumni Hall







1615 Stanley Street







New Britain, CT 06050







Driving Directions
Dear Paul, 















Please join us on Tuesday, November 12 at Central Connecticut State University for Bike Walk Connecticut's Annual Dinner and Silent Auction!
  • Silent Auction, Networking, Cash Bar begins at 5:30 
  • Dinner and program to follow.

We'll kick off the holiday season by celebrating this year's accomplishments and prepare for even more next year.  

 

Join us for dinner with DECD Deputy Commissioner Kip Bergstrom and a discussion of  the important and growing role of active transportation and bikeable, walkable communities in Connecticut's economy and tourism industry. Kip has 30 years of experience as a strategist, business executive, economic development professional and place-maker. Kip's DECD portfolio includes the development of the innovation economy, statewide branding, as well as the arts and culture, historic preservation and tourism functions.

 

The silent auction is a great time to stock up on holiday gifts--or get a great deal on some special purchases, like a South Africa Photo Safari  or a Mother's Day weekend getaway on Martha's Vineyard.  Do you have ideas for silent auction items or have something to contribute yourself? Let us know!








Proceeds benefit Bike Walk Connecticut, your voice for bikeable, walkable communities.
  • Members: $40; $45 after October 31
  • Nonmembers:  $60; $65 after October 31
  • Tables of 10:  $400; $450 after October 31

We look forward to seeing you!









Get more information
Register Now!
I can't make it
This email was sent to mikbenefit@comcast.net by bikewalkct@bikewalkct.org |  
Bike Walk Connecticut | PO Box 270149 | West Hartford | CT | 06127-0149

              















 

Pass this on to anyone else that may be interested.
To register, visit:

Litchfield Hills Cycling Club,